Web Media: PopSugar Bylines

Pop Sugar Editorial Portraits

Screen Shots Enclosed ——– I set up in a small, white office on Friday morning. The room was normally used for impromptu meetings at PopSugar, but today, it was the brightest room available for a portrait shoot. My job was to create a set of byline portraits to be used with each article on the web magazine, and the shot list consisted of over 60 editors from all departments. The shoot was a two-day planned event with five to ten minutes scheduled per editor, and it was orchestrated to whisk the editors in and out for quick head shots in between meetings.

The first day I was scheduled to photograph a little less than half of our target number, with the second shoot on Wednesday carrying the bulk of our work. Several of the editors were from New York or Los Angeles, with a handful from the London office. PopSugar was in the middle of a project, and the energy in the office was bustling. The timing could not have been any more convenient for my job, but that was part of the plan. It’s a once-a-year event that everyone is in San Francisco at once, and the line for the shoot ran down the hall. The office banter among waiting co-workers kept the mood light, and pleasant. With 60 plus people, there was little time to get to know my sitters beyond what their “good side” was, and keeping colleagues nearby for encouragement quickly became a fantastic tool for getting an authentic smile.

The byline portrait shoot was a marathon of sorts, but by the end, we had a great series of photos for the editors to choose from for their articles. I managed to slip in a couple of behind-the-scenes shots too, which are always my favorite to take if I have a moment. The above shots show the editors making adjustments to hair and necklaces. Actual PopSugar bylines with the new pictures are displayed below.

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Megan Wolfe
About the Author:
I'm a San Francisco photographer and writer currently based in the South. My work is inspired by weathered history, interviews with locals, and wanderlust.


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